Speakers


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Dorothy Armstrong
Visiting fellow, The University of Edinburgh

Abstract – Presentation: Daring to be Different
My presentation will describe my experiences as an undergraduate student in the 80s in a decade of great change, described as a social, cultural and political counter revolution to the Thatcher years! Being a student at Edinburgh, provided opportunities to challenge the status quo and ask curious questions whilst being supported and stretched!

Even with great leaps both in nursing and healthcare more generally, exemplary leadership remains constant.  Great leaders are daring and create platforms for change. I will discuss the importance of learning from early pioneers, mentors and leaders and share with you how these memories have shaped and influenced my life, my career and my profession.

Biography
Dorothy’s relationship with Nursing at the University of Edinburgh began in 1980 as a student nurse. Her career focused on acute nursing and intensive care, working as a Sister and Clinical Manager in NHS Lothian. Dorothy worked with NHS Education for Scotland combining her passion for learning in practice and education and she was privileged to lead initiates on advanced nursing roles and senior charge nurse development. In 2009, Dorothy was appointed nursing adviser to the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman, influencing the opportunities for learning from feedback and complaints. She has a particular interest in the emotional triggers that prompt complaints and the power of apology. Dorothy is Chair of North Edinburgh Dementia Care. In 2010 Dorothy was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Edinburgh for services to nursing and is currently a Visiting Fellow.


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Tracy Burton

Abstract – Nursing Studies, Acute Care Nursing and Leadership
Tracy Burton & Anna March
This workshop addresses the role of nursing within the acute hospital setting and will focus its discussion on how nursing will continue to transform within this area of health care amid an ever changing health service. Therefore, as our roles and scope of practice have broadened and developed, how as nurses can we ensure that the core values of our profession remain at the forefront of our nursing practice? How do we ensure there is room for compassion, kindness and person-centred care?  In a modern, demanding and evolving health care climate…can nurses do it all?

Biography
Tracy graduated from the School of Nursing at The University of Edinburgh in 2001. Her clinical career has been based in acute adult nursing and started in Gastrointestinal Medicine with further roles within Urological and Colorectal surgical units. Tracy held a Senior Charge Nurse role in colorectal surgery from 2009-2014 where she developed further interest in the role of nursing within modern healthcare and of patient safety. She was then in a Quality & Safety Improvement role in NHS Lothian focussed on the care of Deteriorating Patients and Anticipatory Care Planning within Acute care, contributing to improvements both locally and nationally.

Tracy is now in a new role as Surgical Nurse Practitioner for colorectal outpatients and is working within the team to explore and develop this exciting role. She has undertaken study at MSc level and is about to embark on an Advanced Practice MSc.

Tracy has recently graduated from the Scottish Improvement Leader (ScIL) Programme which has equipped her with the skills to lead & facilitate Quality Improvement initiatives.

Her current professional interests lie in Person-centred care, Patient Safety, Quality Improvement and Nurse Leadership.


Maggie Carson

Abstract – Modernising the undergraduate curriculum: From the 1990’s to the present day
Maggie Carson & Jennifer Tocher
The undergraduate nursing degree at the University of Edinburgh is a dynamic and evolutionary curriculum, which has adapted and evolved throughout the decades while maintaining the ethos of Elsie Stephenson.
The 1990’s saw the introduction of an honours degree to the undergraduate nursing programme. Initially the students on course were allowed to complete an ‘add-on’ honours year allowing them to exit with this higher qualification. From 1992 students were recruited and admitted to a programme with an honours degree exit. The honours only route continued to be offered until 2012 when an ordinary exit route had to be incorporated in line with the current NMC standards.
To keep pace with the ever changing healthcare environment which our graduates enter and respond to the needs of an ageing population with greater comorbidities, a faster throughput of patients in hospitals, more community focused care and an increase in the use of technology the undergraduate nursing programme has taken many ‘leaps’.
In the revalidated 2012 curriculum these include our focus on: research development, clinical excellence in both hospital and community settings, many specialist strands and the elective opportunity, producing highly skilled graduates who are immediately recognisable as Edinburgh alumni.


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Dr Fiona Cuthill
Lecturer in Nursing Studies, The University of Edinburgh

Biography
Having studied as an undergraduate nursing student at the University of Edinburgh in the 1980s, Fiona Cuthill returned to the Nursing Studies department in 2014 as a lecturer. She has worked as a community nurse in a variety of locations in the UK and her current interests are around social justice and nursing; homelessness, asylum seekers and inclusion health is an ongoing focus of her work and this is reflected in her research and teaching.


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Tonks Fawcett
Professor of Student learning (Nurse Education) and Principal Fellow of the Higher education Academy

Abstract – Clinical education for student nurses: then and now
Tonks Fawcett & Lindy Manson
This last presentation of the day takes a more informal approach. As a new lecturer in the 1980s one of Tonks’s first undergraduate student nurse was Lindy, and they have stayed in touch ever since. Looking back over 30 (not 60!) years, they will discuss how clinical education for student nurses was perceived and organised in the 1980s and compare it critically with what we see in 2016, the leaps taken and the challenges presented.  The discussion will then be opened up to the audience to share memories, ideas and opportunities for clinical education to take into the future.

Biography
Throughout her long career within Nursing studies her focus has always been to ensure the optimal learning of the nursing students at all levels, be it theoretically or, particularly its translation into the clinical setting

Tonks has published widely in academic and professional journals over the years. She was co-editor of the first three editions of the major nursing textbook Nursing Practice: Hospital and Home – The Adult published by Elsevier. She is co-author of Altschul’s Psychology for Nurses published by Bailliere Tindall, co-author of Pathophysiology, Homeostasis and Nursing published by Routledge and co-editor of Perspectives on Cancer Care published by Wiley Blackwell.

Tonks’s aim has always been to equip students of nursing with the critical and compassionate ability to understand, work and lead in 21st century systems of health and nursing care provision.


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Colette Ferguson
Executive Director of Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions at NHS Education for Scotland (NES)

Abstract – Supporting Learning in Practice
Within this presentation I will give a brief oversight of my connection to Nursing Studies including reflection on the personal leap taken in coming to University of Edinburgh for the first time in 1991.  As well as the personal and professional growth that I have experienced as a result of my studies, I will briefly consider the impact this has had on nursing nationally and internationally.

The key theme threaded throughout the presentation will be the endeavour to support the education and learning of students in practice and the impact of my PhD on the genesis of the current practice education infrastructure for a range of professions in Scotland today.

Biography
Dr Colette Ferguson is the Executive Director of Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions (AHP) for NHS Education for Scotland (NES).  NES is a national health board responsible for the education, training and workforce development for those who work in and with the NHS in Scotland.  Colette has responsibility for leading national developments in education and training for the nursing, midwifery and AHP workforce in NHS Scotland as well as collaborating with others to deliver on education and workforce development for health and care across professions, disciplines and sectors.  She works in close collaboration with the Scottish Government, NHS Board Directors, Regulators and with Scotland’s universities and colleges.

She is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh where she was awarded an MSc in Nursing and education in 1992 and a PhD in 2000. Colette has specific interest and expertise in practice based learning and has led and implemented a national network of Practice Education Facilitators and an education support system of nurses and midwives across Scotland.


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Elaine Haycock-Stuart
Senior Lecturer in Nursing Studies

Abstract – Community Nursing:Looking back and leaping forward
This interactive workshop commences with a 5 minute presentation from Dr Linda Pollock recounting her time with Nursing Studies and Dr Lisbeth Hockey for influencing the LEAPS for her and her career.   We then have facilitated discussion in groups identifying what sparked participants passion for community nursing?  Culminating in identifying the critical issues in community nursing today and going forward?

Biography
Dr Elaine Haycock-Stuart is a Senior Lecturer in Nursing Studies with a specific remit for community nursing education.  Having contributed to review  community nursing in Scotland with the Scottish Government and then developing educational frameworks with NHS Education Scotland, Elaine took  responsibility for the leadership component of the Modernising Nursing in the Community website.  Research is focused on service organisation and delivery including leadership and teamwork in primary care and service users’ perspectives.


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Dr Juliet MacArthur, Chief Nurse Research and Development, NHS Lothian
and Lecturer in Clinical Academic Research, Nursing Studies,
The University of Edinburgh

Biography
Juliet has a long association with Nursing Studies; firstly as an undergraduate on the BSC Social Science (Nursing) 1982-1986 and then as a postgraduate undertaking a part-time Masters in Nursing and Health Studies 1991-1993. She currently holds a 0.2 WTE post as a lecturer in the department mainly supporting the Masters of Nursing in Clinical Research and Critical Appraisal in Practice Honours course. Both of these innovative programmes have been excellent models of collaborative education between the university and the NHS.

Within the NHS Juliet is the strategic lead for nursing and midwifery research and focuses on the development of research capacity and capability of the profession through the development and implementation of a collaborative research between the NHS and partners universities. A key feature of this work has been the development of the Lothian Clinical Academic Research Careers (CARC) Scheme in areas such as critical care, substance misuse, weight management, dementia and midwifery.

Her own research work has focussed on care of people with a learning disability in general hospitals, decision-making for discharge to care homes and her PhD was a realistic evaluation of the Leadership in Compassionate Care Programme.


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Lindy Manson

Abstract – Clinical education for student nurses: then and now
Tonks Fawcett & Lindy Manson
This last presentation of the day takes a more informal approach. As a new lecturer in the 1980s one of Tonks’s first undergraduate student nurse was Lindy, and they have stayed in touch ever since. Looking back over 30 (not 60!) years, they will discuss how clinical education for student nurses was perceived and organised in the 1980s and compare it critically with what we see in 2016, the leaps taken and the challenges presented.  The discussion will then be opened up to the audience to share memories, ideas and opportunities for clinical education to take into the future.

Biography
Lindy graduated from the School Of Nursing at Edinburgh University in 1986. She focussed the early part of her career in Intensive Care with clinical positions in Edinburgh, London, and Sydney, Australia.

Subsequently, she worked for ten years as a Clinical Facilitator working alongside new recruits and other learners in Intensive Care at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh, and then as the Education Coordinator for NHS Lothian’s Critical Care Services from 2010 to 2013. She was appointed to Team Lead for NHS Lothian’s Department of Education and Employee Development in August 2013.

As well as her teaching and training commitments, Lindy manages and leads a team of Clinical Educators working in diverse specialities across NHS Lothian.

Her current professional interests lie in the fields of Patient Safety, and Healthcare Associated Infection.


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Anna March

Abstract – Nursing Studies, Acute Care Nursing and Leadership
Tracy Burton & Anna March
This workshop addresses the role of nursing within the acute hospital setting and will focus its discussion on how nursing will continue to transform within this area of health care amid an ever changing health service. Therefore, as our roles and scope of practice have broadened and developed, how as nurses can we ensure that the core values of our profession remain at the forefront of our nursing practice? How do we ensure there is room for compassion, kindness and person-centred care?  In a modern, demanding and evolving health care climate…can nurses do it all?

Biography
Anna March is a graduate of Edinburgh University’s Dept of Nursing, receiving a BSc Honours Degree in 1997. As a Registered General Nurse (RGN), she has worked in NHS England (Nottingham University Hospitals) (University Hospitals Leicester) and NHS Scotland (NHS Lothian) within the specialities of General Surgery and Adult and Cardiothoracic Critical Care. Her experience in Trauma Critical Care patients led to her publication ‘Respiratory Management in Spinal Injury’ in the Journal of Orthopaedic Nursing in 2005 which earned her Elsevier Science’s New Writers Award in 2006.   Anna has spent the last three years in quality improvement and service development work.  Projects such as Releasing Time to Care, Clinical Documentation and Record Keeping and most recently, Person Centred Care Planning have been both challenging and rewarding. Anna took up the post of Clinical Policy Advisor for NHS Lothian in April this year and now oversees the development and approval of clinical policies, documentation and patient information as part of the Clinical Policy, Documentation, & Information Group. She has a keen interest in record keeping and care planning and has been actively educating and striving to re-energise these skills in both registered and unregistered nurses.


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Anne Marie Rafferty CBE, Professor of Nursing Policy, King’s College London

Biography
Anne Marie Rafferty is Professor of Nursing Policy and former Dean of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London. She received her Bachelors (BSc) in Nursing Studies at Edinburgh University, MPhil (Surgery) from Nottingham University and was the first nurse to gain a doctorate from Oxford University (DPhil, Modern History). She won a Harkness Fellowship in Health Policy to the University of Pennsylvania. She was seconded to the Department of Health to work with Lord Ara Darzi on the nursing contribution to the reform of the National Health Service 2007-8 and was awarded a CBE for services to healthcare in 2008. She was appointed as a member of the Prime Minister’s Commission on the Future of Nursing and Midwifery 2009-10. She has been recipient of the 3M/Nursing Times prize for Research, Nursing Times Leadership Award in 2014 and Health Services Journal Top 100 Clinical Leaders Award in 2015. She holds fellowships from the Royal College of Nursing, American Academy of Nursing and was Distinguished International Visiting Professorship at the Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto 2014-15. She was inducted into the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Hall of Fame in Cape Town in 2016.


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Ruth Schröck
Professor Emeritus, Witten/Herdecke Germany

Abstract – A Conversation
Ruth Schröck & Franz Wagner
As colleagues and friends, former students in the then Department of Nursing Studies, teachers in higher education in Scotland and Germany, committed to the development of nursing at national and international levels and in love with Edinburgh, we would like to share some of our experiences, hopes and dreams in celebration of nursing studies at our Scottish alma mater.

Biography
General nursing experience in neurosurgery and as a senior night sister in an Edinburgh hospital, for many years however, as a psychiatric staff nurse (England), ward sister and nurse teacher (Scotland). Lecturer in nursing (University of Edinburgh), Senior Lecturer in Nursing (Dundee College of Technology > Abertay University), Head of Department of Health and Nursing (Queen Margaret College > Queen Margaret University), Professor of Nursing at Queen Margaret College Edin—burgh, University of Applied Sciences Osnabrück Germany (1987-1997), University of Witten/Herdecke Germany (1997-2007). Honorary doctorates from the University of Glamorgan > University of South Wales, University of Edinburgh and University of Witten/Herdecke Germany. Member of the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) 1978-1983 and of the Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting 1983-1987; Chairperson of the Postbasic Nursing Education Committee of the National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting for Scotland 1983-1986.


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Alison Tierney
Former Head of Nursing Studies and Director of the Nursing Research Unit for Scotland

Abstract – Nursing Studies as an early pioneering centre for nursing research
A commitment to research was written into the Rockefeller grant for the establishment of the Nurse Teaching Unit in 1956. Research was virtually non-existent in British nursing at that time, but the NTU had the advantage of being based in a research-strong university. ‘Edinburgh’ quickly became recognised as a pioneering centre for nursing research. This reputation grew, nationally and internationally, with the establishment of the government-funded Nursing Research Unit for Scotland, based in the Department, in 1971. Were these ‘leaps in the dark’? I will offer my view on that, but you can decide.

Biography
Alison first joined Nursing Studies in 1966 as an undergraduate student, returned to do a PhD, and then was appointed as a Lecturer. From 1984 -94 she was Director of the NRU and in 1998, by then back in the Department, she was awarded a Personal Chair in Nursing Research and also became Head of Department. In 2002 it was time for a change and new challenges and Alison left Nursing Studies to head up the School of Nursing at the University of Adelaide in South Australia.

Alison’s name is well known in connection with the Roper-Logan-Tierney model for nursing, but it is for her contribution nationally and internationally to the development of research in nursing that she is best known, as reflected in the award of a RCN Fellowship in 1995, a CBE in 2002 and more recent honorary doctorates from several universities. Alison is now retired, more or less.


Jennifer Tocher

Abstract – Modernising the undergraduate curriculum: From the 1990’s to the present day
Jennifer Tocher & Maggie Carson
The undergraduate nursing degree at the University of Edinburgh is a dynamic and evolutionary curriculum, which has adapted and evolved throughout the decades while maintaining the ethos of Elsie Stephenson.
The 1990’s saw the introduction of an honours degree to the undergraduate nursing programme. Initially the students on course were allowed to complete an ‘add-on’ honours year allowing them to exit with this higher qualification. From 1992 students were recruited and admitted to a programme with an honours degree exit. The honours only route continued to be offered until 2012 when an ordinary exit route had to be incorporated in line with the current NMC standards.
To keep pace with the ever changing healthcare environment which our graduates enter and respond to the needs of an ageing population with greater comorbidities, a faster throughput of patients in hospitals, more community focused care and an increase in the use of technology the undergraduate nursing programme has taken many ‘leaps’.
In the revalidated 2012 curriculum these include our focus on: research development, clinical excellence in both hospital and community settings, many specialist strands and the elective opportunity, producing highly skilled graduates who are immediately recognisable as Edinburgh alumni.


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Franz Wagner
CEO German Nurses Association

Abstract – A Conversation
Franz Wagner & Ruth Schröck
As colleagues and friends, former students in the then Department of Nursing Studies, teachers in higher education in Scotland and Germany, committed to the development of nursing at national and international levels and in love with Edinburgh, we would like to share some of our experiences, hopes and dreams in celebration of nursing studies at our Scottish alma mater.

Biography
General nurse with further nursing education in intensive care nursing, ward management and nurse teaching; MSc (Edin.) in nursing and health sciences. Experienced in psychiatric nursing and intensive nursing care, as well as a teacher and deputy head of a school of nursing. Nursing research experiences in quality management and as executive officer of the Nursing Research Institute at the university hospital in Nuremberg.

National and international experience as chief executive officer of the German Nurses Association (with ca 20 000 members), vice-president of the German advisory nursing council, member of the board of directors of the ICN (2001-1005), Vice-President of the ICN (2005-2009).


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Cathy Warwick
Professor Cathy Warwick CBE is Chief Executive of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM)

Abstract – Leaps in the dark – influencing the national agendas
This short relatively lighthearted presentation,  will track my own experience from Edinburgh University to my current role,  reflect on the strength of the ‘Edinburgh approach’ to nursing (as I perceive it) and consider how far this has influenced my own thinking and therefore recent policy on maternity services.  I will particularly emphasise how important I believe a social model of health is to developing high quality maternity services.

Biography
In her current role, Professor Warwick is closely involved in the development of maternity policy, and has recently been part of a  major review of maternity services in England chaired by Baroness Cumberlege.  Since her appointment, Cathy has worked with four successive Secretaries of State for Health to try to influence policy on behalf of women, forging collaborative relationships with a broad range of organisations with common interests and working closely with obstetricians, gynaecologists and paediatricians and their Royal Colleges.

Professor Warwick continues to be very interested in research and holds honorary professorships at King’s College London and Hong Kong University and received honorary doctorates from the University of Dundee in 2015  and Kingston and St George’s University London in 2007.  Passionate to influence global maternity health, she has led midwifery study tours to South Africa, India and Cuba and will travel  to Sri Lanka in 2016.

Immediately prior to her appointment at the RCM, Professor Warwick was Director of Midwifery and General Manager for Women and Children’s Services at King’s College Hospital, having practiced as a midwife since 1976 in a variety of settings.   Whilst at Kings College she received a CBE for services to healthcare in 2006.

Professor Warwick began her career by gaining a nursing degree at Edinburgh University in 1975. She then completed the one year midwifery course at Queen Charlotte’s Hospital in London in 1976, and worked as a midwife across a variety of clinical settings in hospitals and in the community. She has held a number of senior posts in midwifery education and in the NHS managing midwifery and nursing services.  She has an MSc in Social Policy, an Advanced Diploma in Midwifery (ADM)  and a Post Graduate Certificate in Education of Adults.

Her work has led to invitations to sit on many national maternity policy committees, and she has been a member of the Nursing and Midwifery Council and was Chair of the Midwifery Committee at the Nursing and Midwifery Council, and Chair of the maternity working group contributing to the Darzi report, Healthcare for London.

She has also written and published widely on midwifery issues and lectures and speaks nationally and internationally.

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